Tag Archives: how-to

How to Manage Your WordPress Site from an iPad

I’ll admit, I use my iPad more than my laptop. Equipped with a ZAGG keyboard case and 4G, this little puppy does almost everything I need it to. With the exception of bigger word processing jobs and more complicated image editing, the iPad meets my needs. I did, however, have trouble managing my WordPress sites using Safari on iOS/the iPad. For some reason writing posts was nearly impossible because the WYSIWYG did not work correctly. I had to switch to HTML mode in the editor to get anything done. In the WYSIWYG mode you can’t scroll or add the cursor to the text field.

I struggled to find a good iPad solution for a while, quickly testing the official WordPress app. On first glance, it looks to only work with WordPress.com, not self-hosted installations. It turns out, it works for both. In fact, I’m writing this post from my iPad, although I will need to switch to the laptop for some minimal photo editing stuff.

This post is a review and summary of the official WordPress app for iOS/mobile devices like iPad and iPhone.

The official WordPress app

This app is smooth and easy to use, but it is extremely limited. It is clearly made for writing and editing text content and not much more. You don’t have access to most administrative tools.

  • You can insert images from your camera role or take an image. This would be really handy for flash bloggers that are writing on the fly.
  • There is a very interesting WYSIWYG editor that integrates the HTML and “pretty” text. I actually quite like it.
  • Tags include bold, italic, link, quote, strikethrough, unordered lists, ordered lists, code and more.
  • You can choose tags and categories from pre-existing ones.
  • You can add a featured image but can’t manipulate them.
  • Saving is a little tricky. You only see a publish link, but tapping “Cancel” and choosing “Save Draft” works. This is actually smart, mimicking the iOS email interface.
  • There doesn’t appear to be any other features such as word count. And needless to say, any plugins you utilize that affect the post writing screen in the full WordPress are not available in the mobile app.
  • You can also edit pages, access stats (if you have Jetpack installed) and admin settings which are very limited.
  • There is a nicely integrated comment moderating interface. This is another time saver for people running busy blogs with a busy life.
  • The folks at WordPress did a great job utilizing the rotating feature of the iPad. Tilting the iPad switches the interface based on what you’re probably doing with a vertical vs. horizontal orientation.
  • The last major feature is for WordPress.com users. If you have an account (umm, you do, right?) with WordPress.com, you can read blogs you follow within this app. It’s easy and fast.

Overall, this is a really simple, efficient app. I will need to go into the full WordPress interface in order to clean this post up, add images and do some other things I do to each post I write. But it let me more comfortably put this content together.

Of course, the whole thing will rely on your theme to drive styling. But for a simple blog post, it works very well. It’s important to note that this app does not give you access to publishing features like scheduling. So you can just save and publish.

wordpress ipad login
The simple WordPress iPad app login interface.
wordpress ipad writing interface
The WordPress iPad app writing interface. Simple and clean.
wordpress ipad admin dashboard
The WordPress iPad app “dashboard”.

I was unable to find any solid third party solutions for managing one’s WordPress site. But maybe I missed something. What do you use? Or, if you use the official app, what do you think of it? Perhaps there is room for a premium/paid third-party app.

Moving your WordPress site in 2 easy steps

This tutorial assumes you know how to install a self-hosted WordPress site.  Let’s say you’ve got a wordpress powered blog that you’d like to transfer.  Here’s how to do it in just a couple quick steps:

  1. Log into the dashboard of the old site and under “tools” click “export”.  WordPress will export all of the posts, pages, comments and even images into an XML file.
  2. Log into the dashboard of the new site and under “tools” click “import”.  Select that xml file that you saved in your last step and begin the import.  Voila! Your WordPress site has now been duplicated on the new site.

Remember that this does not affect the theme or any customizations or plugins you were using.  Is that easy or what?